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Reduction of Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity Using Nanocarriers: A Review

[ Vol. 18 , Issue. 3 ]

Author(s):

Michaela Fojtu, Jaromir Gumulec, Tibor Stracina, Martina Raudenska, Anna Skotakova, Marketa Vaculovicova, Vojtech Adam, Petr Babula, Marie Novakova and Michal Masarik*   Pages 237 - 263 ( 27 )

Abstract:


Background: Anthracycline antibiotic doxorubicin (DOX) is a very potent and extensively prescribed chemotherapeutic drug. It is widely utilized in the therapy of variety of haematological and solid tumours, although its administration is commonly accompanied with several severe side effects. The most serious one is a development of dose-dependent and cumulative cardiotoxicity. In the course of time, many strategies have been investigated in order to avoid or at least to diminish DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction; these include reduction of toxic effect by coadministration with iron chelators (dexrazoxane), trastuzumab, taxanes, statins, and ACE-inhibitors. However, the attenuation of cardiotoxic effect is still not satisfactory yet.

Objective: This review represents an overall appraisal of studies concerning with the utilization of various doxorubicinloaded nanoparticles in the cancer treatment with specific emphasis on those studies evaluating their influence on the reduction of heart tissue damage.

Conclusion: Introduction of nanoscale drug delivery systems undoubtedly represents nowadays one of the most promising tools for lowering systemic toxicity. Nanoparticles enable to target the therapeutic payload directly towards the tumor tissue, thus leading to the increased accumulation of the drug in the desired tissue and simultaneously protecting surrounding healthy tissues.

Keywords:

Doxorubicin, nanoparticles, liposomal, polymeric, protein, gold, cardiotoxicity, nanocarriers.

Affiliation:

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 123, CZ-612 00 Brno, Department of Pathological Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 123, CZ-612 00 Brno, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno, Department of Pathological Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno

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