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Associations of CYP2A6 Gene Polymorphism with Smoking Status Among Jordanians: Gender-Related Differences

[ Vol. 20 , Issue. 9 ]

Author(s):

Hana M. Hammad*, Amer Imraish, Belal Azab, Al M. Best, Yousef S. Khader and Malek Zihlif   Pages 765 - 770 ( 6 )

Abstract:


Background: Cytochrome P450 2A6 enzyme (CYP2A6), an essential hepatic enzyme involved in the metabolism of drugs, is responsible for a major metabolic pathway of nicotine. Variation in the activity of polymorphic CYP2A6 alleles has been implicated in inter-individual differences in nicotine metabolism.

Aims: The objective of the current study was to assess the association between the smoking status and the cytochrome P450 2A6 enzyme (CYP2A6) genotype in Jordanians.

Methods: In the current study, 218 (117 Male and 101 female) healthy unrelated Jordanian volunteers were recruited. CYP2A6*1B, CYP2A6*4 and CYP2A6*9 were determined and correlated with subject smoking status.

Results: *1A/*1A was the most common genetic polymorphism in the overall study population, with no significant frequency differences between smokers and non-smokers. When the population was divided according to gender, only male smokers showed a significant correlation between genotype and smoking status. Considering the CYP2A6*9 genotype, the results showed differences in distribution between smokers and non-smokers, but only women showed a significant association between CYP2A6*9 allele genotype and smoking status.

Conclusion: the results of this study show that there is a significant association between CYP2A6*9 genotype and smoking status. They also show that CYP2A6 genotype is significantly influenced by gender.

Keywords:

CYP2A6, polymorphisms, drug metabolism, nicotine, smoking behavior, Jordanians, gender-related differences.

Affiliation:

Department of Biological Sciences, School of Science, The University of Jordan, Amman, Department of Biological Sciences, School of Science, The University of Jordan, Amman, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman,, Jordan; cVirginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA, Department of Community Medicine, Public Health and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman



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