Submit Manuscript  

Article Details


Vitamin D in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Biological, Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects

[ Vol. 20 , Issue. 5 ]

Author(s):

Raúl Vicente Olmedo-Martín, Inmaculada González-Molero, Gabriel Olveira, Víctor Amo-Trillo and Miguel Jiménez-Pérez*   Pages 390 - 398 ( 9 )

Abstract:


Background: Vitamin D has an immunoregulatory action in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) as well as other immune-mediated disorders. Its influence on intestinal permeability, innate and adaptive immunity, and the composition and diversity of the microbiota contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Patients with IBD have a greater prevalence of vitamin D deficiency than the general population, and a possible association between this deficit and a worse course of the disease. However, intervention studies in patients with IBD have proved inconclusive.

Objective: To review all the evidence concerning the role of vitamin D as an important factor in the pathophysiology of IBD, review the associations found between its deficiency and the prognosis of the disease, and draw conclusions for the practical application from the main intervention studies undertaken.

Methods: Structured search and review of basic, epidemiological, clinical and intervention studies evaluating the influence of vitamin D in IBD, following the basic principles of scientific data.

Results: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease activity, quality of life, the consumption of social and healthcare resources, and the durability of anti-TNFα biological treatment. Determination of new metabolites of vitamin D, measurement of its absorption capacity and questionnaires about sun exposure could help identify groups of IBD patients with a special risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Conclusion: Well-designed intervention studies are needed in IBD, with probably higher objective plasma doses of vitamin D to establish its efficacy as a therapeutic agent with immunomodulatory properties. Meanwhile, vitamin D deficiency should be screened for and corrected in affected patients in order to achieve adequate bone and phosphocalcic metabolism.

Keywords:

Inflammatory bowel disease, vitamin D, clinical outcomes, microbiome, inflammation, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis.

Affiliation:

Clinical Management Unit of Digestive Diseases, Regional University Hospital of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga, Malaga, Clinical Management Unit of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Regional University Hospital of Malaga; Institute of Biomedical Research in Malaga (IBIMA), Malaga, Spain; Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga; CIBERDEM, Malaga, Clinical Management Unit of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Regional University Hospital of Malaga; Institute of Biomedical Research in Malaga (IBIMA), Malaga, Spain; Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga; CIBERDEM, Malaga, Clinical Management Unit of Digestive Diseases, Regional University Hospital of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga, Malaga, Clinical Management Unit of Digestive Diseases, Regional University Hospital of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga, Malaga

Graphical Abstract:



Read Full-Text article